Frog of the Week

Fowler’s Toad (Anaxyrus fowleri)

FowlersToad.JPG
photo by Jimpaz

leastconcern
Common Name: Fowler’s Toad
Scientific Name: Anaxyrus fowleri
Family: Bufonidae
Location: Canada and the United States
US Location: Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Vermont, West Virginia
Size: 3.75 inches

The Fowler’s Toad is named in honor after naturalist Samuel Page Fowler, who formed the Essex County Natural History Society, which became the Essex Institute and merged Peabody Museum of Salem to form the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts. The Fowler’s Toad is found mostly in the eastern United States and barely in southern Canada. They breed during summer, from June to August, and the farther south they are, the later they breed. They can lay between 2000 to 10000 eggs in a clutch.

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Frog of the Week

Cranwell’s Horned Frog (Ceratophrys cranwelli)


leastconcern
Common Name: Cranwell’s Horned Frog, Chacoan Horned Frog
Scientific Name: Ceratophrys cranwelli
Family: Ceratophryidae
Location: Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay, and Brazil
Size: 5 inches

The Cranwell’s Horned Frog is a common frog in the pet trade. They have been bred to be a variety of colors but are naturally dark green and brown. They are often referred to as a Pacman Frog because of its resemblance to the video game character. They are sit and wait predators, where they will sit in one spot for hours until something moves in front of them and they snap up and eat it. They eat pretty much any animal that they can fit in their mouths.

Frog of the Week

Tiger-striped Leaf Frog (Phyllomedusa tomopterna)

Phyllomedusa tomopterna,Makifrosch, Tiger-striped leaf frog
photo by  Frank Teigler

leastconcern
Common Name: Tiger-striped Leaf Frog
Scientific Name: Phyllomedusa tomopterna
Family: Hylidae
Location: Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Peru, Suriname, and Venezuela
Size: 2.3 inches or 60 mm

The Tiger-striped Leaf Frog is a beautiful frog found in the Amazon Rain Forest. These frogs are arboreal (living in trees) and nocturnal (active during the night). Since they live in trees, they also reproduce in the trees and lay their eggs on leaves hanging over pools of water. Once the eggs hatch, the tadpoles drop into the water where they stay until they fully complete their metamorphosis.

Herper of the week

Herper of the Week: Dr. Rob Denton

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Each week a “Herper” of the Week is chosen. These individuals come from all sorts of backgrounds but they all have one common interest – “herps” (reptiles and amphibians). Hopefully, you will learn about them and their important work.

This week’s herper is Dr. Rob Denton, soon to be Assistant Professor at the University of  Minnesota – Morris starting next term. Dr. Denton earned his Ph.D in Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology from THE Ohio State University in 2017. The last year he has worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Connecticut’s Department of Molecular and Cell Biology.

Dr. Denton research focuses on amphibians especially the unisex salamanders of the family Ambystomatidae. These all female salamander populations are found in the Eastern United States. They reproduce by stealing sperm from other male species of salamanders. Rob is also working on completing the genome of the African Bullfrog (Pyxicephalus adspersus). 

Other Amphibian of the Week

Blue Spotted Salamander (Ambystoma laterale)

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photo by Henk Wallays

leastconcern
Common Name: Blue Spotted Salamander
Scientific Name: Ambystoma laterale
Family: Ambystomatidae
Location: Canada and USA
US Location: Connecticut, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Massachusetts, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Vermont,and Wisconsin
Size: 5 inches

The Blue Spotted Salamander is a beautiful salamander that is found in the Southeastern Canada and Northeastern United States of America. It is a member of the family Ambystomatidae which is known as the Mole Salamanders. They received this nickname due to the fact that they spend most of their life in burrows in the ground. The Blue Spotted Salamander does come out of these burrows in the spring when it is time to mate. They migrate to ponds to breed where they can lay as many as 200 eggs. It takes around a month for the eggs to hatch and then it takes the rest of the summer for them to finalize their metamorphism. Then they head onto land, only to return back to a pond in a few years to breed.

 

Frog of the Week

Eastern Gray Tree Frog (Hyla versicolor)

GrayTreeFrog
leastconcern
Common Name: Eastern Gray Tree Frog
Scientific Name: Hyla versicolor
Family: Hylidae
Location: Canada and the United States of America
US Location: Connecticut, District of Columbia, Delaware, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, North Dakota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Vermont, Wisconsin, and West Virginia.
Size: around 2 inches

The Eastern Gray Tree Frog is a common tree frog found along the eastern United States and Canada. The Eastern Gray Tree Frog is not always gray, it can also be green because they change their color based on their environment. The Eastern Gray Tree Frog is identical to the Cope’s Gray Tree Frog except for the call and the number of chromosomes.

 

Frogs of the World

Amazon Milk Frog (Trachycephalus resinifictrix)

amazon milk
photo by D. Gordon E. Robertson

leastconcern
Common Name: Amazon Milk Frog or Mission Golden-eyed Tree Frog<
Scientific Name: Trachycephalus resinifictrix
Family: Hylidae
Location: Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Peru, Suriname,  and Venezuela
Max Size: 3.5 inches for females, 3 inches for males

The Amazon Milk Frog is a fairly large species of tree frog found in South America. They are commonly found in the pet trade now. They are named the “Milk” frogs because they release a milky secretion when threatened by a predator. For breeding, the Amazon Milk Frog lays their eggs in hollow trees that hatch the very next day.

Other Amphibian of the Week

Eastern Tiger Salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum)

IMG_0645
leastconcern
Common Name: Eastern Tiger Salamander
Scientific Name: Ambystoma tigrinum
Family:  Ambystomatidae
Location: United States, Canada, and Mexico
US Locations: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, North Dakota, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Wisconsin
Size: around 8 inches

The Eastern Tiger Salamander is the most widespread salamander in North America, found from southern Canada down to northern Mexico, but it is hardly seen. The Tiger Salamander usually spends most of its life underground in burrows. The best options to see a wild one is either during / after rain or when they are breeding in water bodies. There are some Eastern Tiger Salamanders that are fully aquatic and neotenic, meaning they kept their larval features such as gills.

 

Frog of the Week

Common Toad (Bufo bufo)

1280px-Common_toad_(Bufo_bufo)_Kampinos
photo from https://www.sharpphotography.co.uk/

leastconcern
Common Name: Common Toad
Scientific Name: Bufo bufo
Family: Bufonidae
Location: Europe
Size: 6 inches

The Common Toad is found almost everywhere in Europe besides on some islands such as Iceland and Ireland. The Common Toad is kind of your standard toad. They are highly terrestrial besides during breeding season where they migrate to ponds to breed. Breeding usually takes place in spring when the toads wake up from hibernation.

Other Amphibian of the Week

Greater Siren (Siren lacertina)


leastconcern

Common Name: Greater Siren
Scientific Name: Siren lacertina
Family: Sirenidae
Location: United State – Alabama, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Texas, and Virginia
Size: 3.2 feet or 98 cm

The Greater Siren (and all Sirens) is found in the Southeastern United States. It is the largest of all the sirens, with some reaching over 3 feet long. Just like all sirens, they lack hind legs but they still retain their gills into adulthood. Not much is known about the biology of the Greater Siren because of their secretive nature as they hide in burrows during the day and are slightly more active during the night.